Helping you get through tough times

Learning to understand schizophrenia

There are many myths and stereotypes out there about psychosis and schizophrenia that aren’t helpful to anyone who receives or is close to someone who receives a diagnosis.

abstract in black and whiteHere’s a personal story from one of our volunteers about getting the right information.

“Your mom has schitzo-phree- nia”, the doctor solemnly declared to fourteen-year- old me, as I stood next to my astonished but composed father.

Who could explain?

I burst into tears, even though I had no idea why I was crying. Who could I turn to, to talk about this significant yet deeply confusing word?

My father had now found himself with huge responsibilities of looking after my younger sister and I singlehandedly, while still paying the mortgage.

I felt that I would be burdensome if I asked him to explain what schizophrenia even meant.

Feeling able to help

Despite my best efforts to remain open towards the term, my curiosity was never far behind. It was necessary for me to understand what my mom was going through, because I felt that then I could help her get better.

As soon as I began my Google search, my concerns were immediately addressed when I discovered ReachOut.com’s article covering this topic.

Clear and easy to understand

Despite being an avid reader of information-dense books, I had never felt more relieved to encounter
such a concise, informative and well written article in relation to schizophrenia.

From the start, it was obvious that the writer for ReachOut had established an excellent structure and coherency to their writing.

Defining the condition

The clinical definition for the disorder was described effectively in the opening paragraph, followed by a list of possible symptoms and effects, meaning that someone of any age could understand what schizophrenia is.

Encouraging openness

By ReachOut.com providing simple yet incredibly helpful articles regarding mental health issues, they are encouraging more people to seek additional help and support, creating a more open society with a healthy mindset towards mental health and mental health problems.

For that reason, I am always grateful to this wonderful organisation and its staff.

What can I do now?

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