Helping you get through tough times

Looking after yourself while pregnant

Being pregnant changes your body’s needs, and it’s important to look after those needs.

Hands forming a heartPregnancy can really affect how you are feeling. You have times when you feel really good and other times when you don’t feel so good.

It’s a good idea to have someone you trust who you can talk to during your pregnancy.

Talking to a doctor

When you first find out you are pregnant, find a doctor you’re comfortable with.

It’s recommended you stay with the same doctor throughout your pregnancy. During the pregnancy, your doctor can be very helpful in ensuring you’re safe and comfortable.

Your doctor is able to talk with you about the stages of your pregnancy and what you can be doing to keep you and your baby healthy.

They can also provide you with options for having the baby.

Suggestions to look after yourself

To look after yourself during pregnancy there is a whole lot of things you may wish to consider.

Diet

What you need to eat changes when you are pregnant. Your body needs extra nutrients to help you and your baby stay healthy. Your doctor or a dietician are two people that may be helpful for you to talk to about what is good to eat during pregnancy.

Exercise

Exercising while you are pregnant may also be helpful for reducing stress and relieving back pain. Going for a light swim or walk are two options. Take care if you are exercising not to over do it. Speaking with your doctor or a fitness instructor may be helpful in working out what level of exercise is right for you.

Drugs and alcohol

It is recommended that when you are pregnant you don’t take drugs or alcohol. Taking drugs or alcohol may not be safe for your baby. Your doctor can give you more information about pregnancy and the affects of drugs and alcohol.

Talk to a woman you trust

Being pregnant is a unique experience. However, there are some things that happen to everyone. It may be helpful to have a woman you can trust and who has been pregnant to share your experience with. This person may be your mum, sister, grandmother, aunt or a friend.

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This article was last reviewed on 24 April 2017

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