Helping you get through tough times

Self-harm and young people

When someone engages in self-harm (also known as self-injury) they inflict physical harm upon themselves, usually in secret.

self-harm booklet Some examples are cutting, burning, biting or hitting your body, pulling out hair or scratching and picking at sores on your skin.

Why would someone self-harm?

Most commonly, self-harm is a behaviour that is used to cope with difficult or painful feelings.

Self-harm is not necessarily a suicide attempt, and engaging in self-harm may not mean that someone wants to die. Most commonly, self-harm is a behaviour that is used to cope with difficult or painful feelings.

If you learn someone is engaging in self-harm

Don’t panic. Let them know you support them. 

ReachOut.com, in conjunction with the HSE, have created this information booklet for parents and concerned adults. 

Helpful links

Follow us on Twitter

Follow us on Facebook